TV Violence and Children’s Aggressiveness

Abstract

One of the notable changes in the social environment since the twentieth century has been mass media’s saturation of culture and daily lives. The mass media has become the center of many children’s lives, which has had an enormous impact on their values, beliefs, and behaviors. This study is important to the sociology of media since it investigates how mass media impact adolescents’ behavior. The study’s research question is to address how violence in TV and the media affect adolescents and their aggression level.

Anderson, C. A., Berkowitz, L., Huesmann, R. L., Johnson, J. D., Linz, D., Wartell, E., & Malamuth, N. M. “The Influence of Media Violence on Youth.” Psychology Science in the Public Interest, 4(3): 1-110.

According to Anderson and his co-authors (2003), they believe that there is unequivocal evidence that suggests that media violence increases the chances of an adolescent becoming violent and aggressive in behavior. Through randomized experiment that incorporated the use of cross-sectional and longitudinal survey, the study indicated that the effects appear larger for milder than for more severe forms of aggression but are substantial on severe forms of violence. The article is important to the topic because it delves deeper into how TV and media violence can have an immediate and long-term effect on an individual (Anderson et al., 2003). This article is different from other articles used in the study since it reveals an earlier indication of aggressiveness and change in behavior of the adolescent.

Carter, C. & Weaver, K. C. 2003. Violence and Media. Amsterdam University Press.

Cater and Weaver’s Violence and Media book seek to answer why there are many portrayals of violence in the media and the meanings attached to representations of violence in the media. Through reviewing highly influential readings the book provides an in-depth understanding of media violence’s current thoughts and the influence it has on the audiences (Carter & Weaver, 2003). Therefore, the book is crucial to the topic since it seeks to establish why the media always portrays violence, yet it harms its audiences. The book is different from other sources since it explains why media consistently portrays violence regardless of the negativity.

Freedman, J. L. “Effect of Television Violence on Aggressiveness.” Psychological Bulletin, 96(2): 227-246.

Freedman’s article offers a review on the relation that might be there between exposure to TV violence and subsequent aggressiveness behavior. Through review and correlation methods, the study indicated that even though exposure to and preference for violent programming on TV correlates to aggressive behavior, no evidence shows that viewing violence in naturals settings triggers subsequent aggressiveness (Freedman, 1984). The article is essential to study topic because it compares the impact of viewing violence in a natural setting to that portrayed in the media to establish how radical the influence of TV violence is on adolescents. The article’s uniqueness stems from the fact that it incorporates natural and virtual violent settings to portray how TV violence is harmful to society.

Huesmann, R. L. “The Impact of Electronic Media Violence: Scientific Theory and Research.” Journal of Adolescent Health, 41(6): S6-S13.

Huesmann’s article focuses on why exposure to media violence has detrimental effects on the behavior of children. The use of psychological theory provides an in-depth view of both short and long-term effects of TV violence upon the youths. Randomized and quasi experiments coupled with cross-sectional and longitudinal were used in the study. The article’s psychological aspect makes it vital for the study topic to answer how TV and media violence triggers aggressive behavior among adolescents (Huesmann, 2007). The psychological theory reveals Huesmann article’s peculiarity compared to other articles or source since the theory pieces together other characteristics of an individual are impacted by the TV violence to bring out the aggressive behavior.

Huesmann R. H., & Eron, L. D. 2016. Television and the Aggressive Child: A cross-national Comparison Vol. 7. Routledge.

Rowell’s and Eron’s book provides perfect psychological processes that link media violence to a child’s aggressiveness. The book bases its understanding on the earlier studies but deviates by delving deeper into aggression study that involves comparing media influence across five countries. This aspect of the book concerning the cross-national comparison of aggressiveness among the children offers a fertile ground to mine data that helps draw meaningful conclusions for the study (Rowell & Eron, 2016). The book’s broadness in investigating how TVs trigger hostility in children presents its uniqueness among other sources that report on the topic.

Krcmar, M., & Greene, K. “Predicting Exposure to and Uses of Television Violence.” Journal of Communication, 49(3): 24-45.

The article’s authors seek to point out that people are different in the way they seek stimulation and process information. Through cross-sectional survey and content analysis, the study revealed the relation between sensation seeking and exposure to violence and nonviolent television and the role that TV violence plays among high sensation-seeking adolescents (Krcmar & Greene, 2006). The aspect of varying sensation seeking and their relation to media violence exposure brings out the article’s importance to the study topic as far as broadening the study’s scope is concerned, which shows the peculiarity of the article.

Rosenkoetter, L. I., Sharon, R. E., & Acock, A. C. “Television Violence: An Intervention to Reduce its Impact on Children.” Journal of Applied Development Psychology, 30(4): 381-397.

The article’s authors carried out a study that seeks to develop an intervention to reduce TV violence’s impact on children. Through the interviews that were carried out, the study concluded that reducing children’s exposure to less violent TV minimizes the likelihood of them getting involved in violent behaviors. The article is essential to the study topic since it offers an evidence-based remedy to controlling children’s aggressiveness due to the violence portrayed on TV and media (Rosenkoetter et al., 2009). The aspect of dealing with children in a classroom setup helps provide information on children’s behavior change due to TV violence; thus, this makes the article different from others.

Turner, C. W, Hesse, B. W., & Peterson-Lewis, S. “Naturalistic Studies of the Long-term Effects of Television Violence.” Journal of Social Issues, 42(3): 51-73.

The article shows how carefully controlled experimental laboratory research can provide valuable information on media violence’s effects on viewers’ aggressive behavior in a laboratory setting. The study ascertained that TV violence produces a long-term increase in boys’ aggressive behavior compared to girls (Bradford et al., 1986). The inclusion of the laboratory in the study presents the accuracy of the results presented and thus why this research will use it. The article’s use of multiple quasi-experimental studies on the effects of naturally occurring media violence to ascertain its impact on different genders makes its different from other articles.

References

Anderson, C. A., Berkowitz, L., Huesmann, R. L., Johnson, J. D., Linz, D., Wartell, E., & Malamuth, N. M. “The Influence of Media Violence on Youth.” Pyschology Science in the Public Interest, 4(3): 1-110.

Carter, C. & Weaver, K. C. 2003. Violence and Media. Amsterdam University Press.

Freedman, J. L. “Effect of Television Violence on Aggressiveness.” Psychological Bulletin, 96(2): 227-246.

Huesmann, R. L. “The Impact of Electronic Media Violence: Scientific Theory and Research.” Journal of Adolescent Health, 41(6): S6-S13.

Huesmann R. H., & Eron, L. D. 2016. Television and the Aggressive Child: A Cross-national Comparison Vol. 7. Routledge.

Krcmar, M., & Greene, K. “Predicting Exposure to and Uses of Television Violence.” Journal of Communication, 49(3): 24-45.

Rosenkoetter, L. I., Sharon, R. E., & Acock, A. C. “Television Violence: An Intervention to Reduce its Impact on Children.” Journal of Applied Developemnt Psychology, 30(4): 381-397.

Turner, C. W, Hesse, B. W., & Peterson-Lewis, S. “Naturalistic Studies of the Long-term Effects of Television Violence.” Journal of Social Issues, 42(3): 51-73.